The Last Lions2011
| Forum | Gallery | Quotes || The Last Lions: DVD | Blu-Ray | Collectibles

The Fate of the Crippled Cub

Posted by G7315 - Sunday, March 27th, 2011

72 replies

To the Jouberts:

I just saw your beautiful movie, The Last Lions. One thing bothered me terribly and I can't get it off my mind: What ultimately happened to the little female cub whose back was broken and therefore unable to use her hind legs??? I know the mother lion left her by the edge of the water due to the instinctual directive to abandon flawed offspring, but I'm wondering if you and/or your crew stepped in at all to help the disabled cub. I realize this is the way of Mother Nature and most animal photographers/videographers believe in leaving nature to its own course, come what may, but I would just like to know if perhaps someone had a chance to either euthanize the cub so it wouldn't die a slow death by starvation or from being killed by a predator. Even better, if perhaps the cub was rescued and taken to a vet to see if anything could be done for it. I don't mean to be over-emotional about it because I know these kinds of things happen every day in the wild, but often humans can, and do, rise above simple instinct to help those who cannot help themselves. I would really, really appreciate an answer...even if it's the one I may not prefer to hear. Thank you in advance.

72 replies

Posted by G7413 - Thursday, April 21st, 2011

Have you ever found an answer to this question? I just saw the movie today and feel exactly as you do. I can't get the image of that cub being left behind out of my head either. I know that is nature, but it is still hard to swallow. I would really like to know if anyone did anything for this cub, even if it was to end it's suffering. And if not, then did they followed up on it till its death? I think the movie was great and the the Jouberts are doing a wonderful thing to bring more awareness to the general public. I would just like some closure on the issue with the crippled cub.

Posted by G7430 - Saturday, April 30th, 2011

I read an article recently where the interviewer asked Beverly Joubert the very same question - and I have been wondering the same thing! She said that the producers had to follow the lioness to continue filming. They went back later to look for the cub but she wasn't there. Beverly figures she was probably taken by vultures or hyenas. :( Breaks my heart, poor darling. The interviewer was I think trying to get at the point that they're making a documentary about saving the lions - why not step in and save a lion while they're there. Though I suppose that kind of steps on the point of the documentary, I'd love to have seen that little cub rescued or at least meet a more humane end. It's been bothering me ever since I saw the movie. I've been trying to find that article again and haven't had any luck. I'll post the link here if I find it.

Posted by G8095 - Monday, December 19th, 2011

Sickened and Saddened by the actions of the filmmakers toward cub

Posted by G10101 - Thursday, October 01st, 2015

its a shame

Beverly Joubert shame on u .. plz plz Miss/ Mr. administrator do share dis msg dt its so bad dt no 1 went 2 help JUNIOR n its extremely sad 2 hear dis . she was such a lovely lioness . shes was a kid n atleast 4 d sake of dis sm1 had 2 help her mannn .. m very upset . ove you dear .. dear JUNIOR <3 <3

Posted by G10353 - Friday, March 17th, 2017

Wtf

U r a d head. Can you not spell a single word pal?

Posted by G10418 - Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

Fate of crippled cub

I understood why didnt u? U would freak out if it was shorthand lol

Posted by G10350 - Monday, March 06th, 2017

Heartbreak regarding the crippled cub in the video and the plight of the mother lion

I am captivated by the large cat videos - to this date that was the most disturbing video I've ever seen, No Doubt! The mother comes back looking for her letter to find the only Cub left is the one that's paralyzed from the waist down. She seems so very tortured as a mother, as to what to do? Sister's making the Grimace face I wasn't sure what that face was and then the decision to have to turn in leave sound coming out of her soul, her heart, unbearable! Will you know the animals feel such incredible love and will give their life for these hubs each and every day to have to turn and leave was one of the saddest things I've ever seen! And I always wondered what happened to the map? I do believe that's when the person filming the documentary needs to step in and do the Humane thing! That's a video that should be shown more often so people understand plight of the mother lion. Please let me know if anything was ever found out about how the cub met it's end?

Posted by G8969 - Thursday, November 29th, 2012

No excuses!

I too continue to think about that injured cub and initially I was planning to donate in an effort to help make a difference; however, without proof the Jouberts or their associates helped that cub then I refuse to donate.I believe that was the perfect opportunity to truly make an impact greater than any of the final and resulting documentary filming. No excuses!

Posted by G10277 - Thursday, October 06th, 2016

Why bug and follow the animals if you ain't going to help them..nosy photographers!

Posted by G10387 - Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

the lion cub with broken pelvis

look at america today, this generation is more willing than ever to save the life of disabled animals to rush out and protect those that are being inhamanely treated. they are stepping up for the voiceless. these people that get to experience a rare opportunity like following a lion pride would be surprised by the outreach they would recieve by our community. intervene! maybe you was put there for that exact reason to help not just watch. be active. lions need our help more than ever at this piont.

Posted by G8138 - Sunday, January 08th, 2012

I F@$%G NEED TO KNOW!!

Posted by G10130 - Tuesday, December 08th, 2015

If you watch a re-run of the Last Lion you will see a vulture flying overhead so it would appear that the vulture flew in and devoured that precious little cub. SHAME ON MAN FOR NOT CHOSING TO STEP IN AND SAVE THAT PRECIOUS LITTLE CUB!!!!

Posted by G10240 - Friday, June 17th, 2016

Little lion cub

I think it was an awful thing to leave that lion cub left to die. I hope these people who made this documentary are no longer are able to make anymore. You discust me to my very core.

Posted by G10341 - Friday, February 10th, 2017

Reply

You guys do realize these cameras are set up there for months at a time rite? And when they actually do go back to get the camera and retrieve he footage everything is long gone rite? For example, cameras are set up in January and they don't go back up there till about march maybe to see what they got

Posted by G10415 - Saturday, September 30th, 2017

Little lion cub

This is fore the people that made this movie I hope you die in pain like the cub did

Posted by G8166 - Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

Well, I JUST saw the movie and was wondering if they decided to help the cub. I think it's extremely hypocritical of them to call for help for all lions and not help this particular cub.They made a decision to not help if it's not "man-made" damage? Who gave you the right to make such a decision?One lion at a time, help them, should have helped the cub!

Posted by mmguard - Thursday, January 26th, 2012

Reply to Guest [83.21.44.171]

I totally agree with you. To answer your question and expand upon my previous comment of "Sickened and Saddened by the actions of the filmmakers toward cub", Beverly Joubert goes on to say in her interview that because they were following the mother lion, they couldn't stay with the cub. However, someone went back the next day and she wasn't there. YEAH RIGHT!!! She's was killed by then you pretend lion lover!!! I'm convinced they are all in it for the money PERIOD. Poor baby. She was in such poor shape they could have put her in the back of the jeep just to avoid her getting torn apart and eaten by hyenas.

Posted by G8176 - Friday, February 03rd, 2012

if you are making a movie for saving lions. one injured cub's life would be important for you. You would take it on a jeep in stead of going after the lioness without it. now, you can not make anyone believe that you are doing it for saving them. all about the money!

Posted by G8202 - Monday, February 27th, 2012

Thank you all for posting in this thread. As heartbroken as I am after seeing this doco, i feel ever so slightly better knowing I'm not the only one sickened by the actions of the film makers. Having done a media arts major at university, I understand that ethical issues in film making are discussed at even the most novice level. How did the Jouberts get this so wrong?!?

Posted by G8376 - Thursday, May 31st, 2012

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTzW1I7XD-Jkthis will answer your quiestion, i saw the documentary last night i was haunted by the same story..so sad.

Posted by G8963 - Monday, November 26th, 2012

The crippled Cub with broken back, Did someone help him or was ge left alone.

I cried when I watched this, it was so sad, I cant keep thinking about the poor little cub and what happened to him.

Please say he was rescused and taken to vet, or euthanized him so he woudlnt suffer!

I would have taken the cub and see how he could be helped. That was the mostsweetest cubs I would take care of him till he gets better

Posted by G9199 - Friday, May 03rd, 2013

I cried too. It was so sad.

Posted by G8964 - Monday, November 26th, 2012

i just saw this on CBS 60 minutes and it saddened me terribly. I was very sad for the cub but am more sad for the lioness who seemed saddened herself that she had to leave her cub.

The cubs eyes were still bright and his head perky when the mother left. But think -- there is probably only one truck following and filming these animals and they are very far from proper medical attention. They would have to put the cub in the truck and try to keep it safe and comfortable as it bounced around the velt. That alone could have ended the cubs life. I doubt that the filmmakers carry euthanasia materials with them when they are out filming.

It was just so sad to witness. The mother realizing she needed to leave the cub after she tried to get him to walk on all paws and the little cub meowing as he realized the lioness was leaving.

Posted by G8970 - Thursday, November 29th, 2012

I saw the same footage and it broke my heart and has haunted me too. Why on earth couldn't someone step in and at least put that poor baby to rest rather than suffer and die a horrible death? Isn't being able to help injured and suffering animals one of the things that sets humans apart from animals? To abandon that cub when aid could have and should have been given is unforgivable! Any reason why someone on that team didn't give some kind of aid or relief to that baby is nothing but a poor excuse!!

Posted by G8991 - Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

The entire film documentary was enthralling to watch. However, the scene where the mother lion goes out to hunt and climbs a dead tree to rest far from where she has left her two remaining cubs behind in the brush with the Buffalo close by seems like abandonment. The cubs stay behind waiting patiently for their mother to return after feeding herself but to wake up the next morning to a herd of Buffalos that come into the brush to seek out her two remaining cubs. However, one (male) cub manages to escape but his sister (female) gets crushed by the Buffalos and ends up with a broken back. When the mother lion returns she finds the injured female cub crying for its mother. The mother greets the cub by holding it in its mouth and then picking up the cub in the usual fashion. I immediately saw and identified that the cub's back was injured since that part of the cub's body is limp and lifeless. I experienced this with a kitten I owned and immediately took it to a vet to be told nothing could be done to help the kitten and thus the animal was put to sleep. The mother lion was disturbed about her cub, however, couldn't do anything to fix the cub's back. The scene was extremely sad and tearful to watch as the cub cried,trying to follow the mother, meanwhile dragging its body to catch up to its mother desperately not to be left alone while crying all the way. When the mother lion stopped the cub stopped and cried louder as if to say "help me, I can't keep up with you. Pick me up and take me with you." It definitely seemed like a very, and callous thing for the mother lion to just leave her helpless, female cub crying but that is nature. The shot where the mother lion stops and closes her eyes before moving on was an indication that she was extremely hurt, sad, angry that she lost another cub. She lost the first female cub in the crossing of the water when a croc snapped it out of the water. She didn't seem to care about that one that much nor show any emotion. I would think she would've gone back to help the poor thing. However, again her instincts told her it was a weak cub since it was smaller and slower from the other two cubs she bore.

Posted by G9021 - Friday, January 04th, 2013

Crippled cub

I was saddened and appaulled myself. How on could couth they drive off with that cub there. I am assuming that they would have had to do the same thing with a dead water buffalo. I was also appaulled that they did not step in and put the male lion ( Ma di Tau's mate) out of its misery as well. He was left to suffer for days.
This message (#10427) is pending to be reviewed by a moderator.

Posted by G10129 - Tuesday, December 08th, 2015

You are so quick to criticize the lioness for leaving her injured cub even though you acknowledged that's the natural instinct of wildlife. You also criticized her for not going back to the river after her other cub that was eaten by a crocodile. If she had gone after her other cub, she too risked being killed. She was right to stay with her two surviving cubs to protect and care for them. You could see and feel the pain and heartache she felt when she walked away from her cub for the last time. She even risked her own life to avenge her cub when she fought and killed the buffalo that maimed her daughter. She was a very loving and protective mother. If you must criticize someone, criticize the film makers, who said they could not interfere with nature. Surely they know that the poochers and murderers of these precious animals are the ones who have interfered with nature so any act they did to help save these animals is justified to sustain these endangered species. They are interceding on their behalf. Man is responsible for their diminished number so why shouldn't man step in and save them. The film makers could have sought medical care for the little cub or if her injury was to severe, she could have been euthanized to end her suffering instead of being eaten by a vulture. Let us use our voices and take a stand to intercede on behalf of these precious animals.

Posted by G9072 - Thursday, February 14th, 2013

Voyeur filmmakers!

Posted by neofelis - Wednesday, March 06th, 2013

The scene brought tears to my eyes. Many people here throw pieces of buffallo-dung at the Jouberts. Well, I myself believe that they had been rather indiffrent and callous, as most South Africans seem to be (They are South Africans). The thing is, they had been following around and filming the cubs (and their mother) for months on end to catch their cutest moments and, when the prospect of having to do something about the injured cub outweighed her cuteness, they just simply picked up and moved on, with their tongues clicking--Their care for the cub did not extend beyond her cuteness and into her being a liability for them. Self-serving people. Hrrrmph

Posted by Murphy - Monday, April 01st, 2013

If the whole idea of the documentary is that there are too few lions left in the wild why wouldn't the filmmakers try to save one? That the filmmakers were in a position to possibly save one precious baby and didn't underscores how dangerous humans are to wildlife. Their indifference is chilling.

Posted by G9154 - Saturday, April 06th, 2013

the whole point of "saving lions" is for man to stay out of the course of nature. it was very sad to see that poor little cubs life ended and noone would deny that. however there is something terribly wrong with all of you to not understand that man needs to stay out of the way. im sure you all were cheering for her to bring down a water buffalo, but why? was the buffalo not cute enough? what about a mother hawk who because of the buffalo scaring away prey could not find food for her babies? as sad as it is, that little lion cub could have fed her children. if you cannot handle real life please, go watch the lion king as it is better suited for you. then maybe you can learn all about "the circle of life" as i did an an 8 yr old. not donating to save lions because MAN DID NOT INTERVENE. ridiculous! you should be ashamed of yourself.

Posted by G10187 - Friday, March 18th, 2016

STOP ACTING AS IF YOU DON'T HAVE COMMON SENSE.

Finally someone said it. I too was sadden by what happened with the little cub, but to say you won't help because you didn't like the fact that they did nothing makes you even worse of a human being you don't have to donate to their cause if you feel like they did something wrong which they didn't there are other causes and then you all talk as if the lioness is human they are animals and they live by their own code yet you seem to think that they should think like humans and go back and try to save their young please have some common sense. Even when I say this take a moment and think about all the mothers that have killed and abused their children being human beings those are the real animals all the lioness did was leave behind her injured cub because she could do nothing else that cub was not going to make it out there at all after that and then you say put her to sleep are you people joking put her to sleep with what they are fiim makers they don't have the equipement nor the knowledge to perform that type of procedure the best they could have done was shot it in the head which they should not have done the cub was food for another hungry animal that needed to survive out there and that is what nature is people these are not human beings they are animals and yet more of them treat their cubs better than some humans treat their kids. So please stop talking as if none of you have common sense about life we all know how sad it was and no one has the right to interfere with nature that is the problem now you always want to mess with something you got no business messing with leave them alone to live they have their own code so let it be and stop knocking the film makers for not rescuing the cub really think about what you are saying and then think about the entire picture. I love all cats wait I love all animals but my favorite is cats and I hate to see any die but it is nature the circle of life that is how they live out there and you or no one else have the right to change or intervene in that no matter how sad the circumstances. Exactly why their is a shortage with the wild life now not because of the deaths they do on each other its because of humans once again. We need to get it right because we are f.....g up left and right. I'm just saying we need to get our stuff right before going in on what the lioness (animal) did wrong with her cub and what the film makers did wrong worse things is going on in the world people.
This message (#10429) is pending to be reviewed by a moderator.

Posted by G9177 - Monday, April 22nd, 2013

This movie is appalling and disgusting. To leave that lion cub with a broken back was heartless and repulsive. If you could not get it to a vet for care, you at least put it out of it's misery and suffering. Was this done for some kind of dramatic effect? All of you who took part in this segment of the movie ought to be ashamed and embarrassed to have taken part in this. This by far is the cruelest and inhumane treatment of an animal that I have ever seen.

I never write comments on the web but I just had to say something about this indignant act of humanity.

Posted by scubascarlett - Thursday, May 09th, 2013

I just watched this show of the lions and was disgusted with the fact that the film makers did not at lest allow the small female cub with the broken back to be euthanize the cub so it wouldn't die a slow death in pain and scared!! I am sickened by the lack of conscience and human emotion these film makers showed! I write this heartbroken for the cub and furious at everyone connected with the decisions to not help the poor cub!!

Posted by G9226 - Tuesday, May 21st, 2013

Stating they couldnt help the cub because they were busy following the lioness is lame...how could you drive away from that baby and then use the footage to try to raise money....I will never give a dime and encourage others to do the same....

Posted by G9243 - Wednesday, June 05th, 2013

I wrote to National Geographics - Here is my letter and their response.

I just saw a piece on 60 minutes for The Last Lions. I was in tears when I the little female cub whose back was broken and therefore unable to use her hind legs??? I know the mother lion to leave her. Did anyone try to the disabled cub?

Unfortunately, I don’t think I’ll ever forget this. I’ll hear the cub mewing forever. Please tell me the cub was taken care of.

Their response:

Thank you for contacting the National Geographic Society.

Unfortunately, after the cub in “Last Lions” was injured by the water buffalo, the mother of the injured cub was forced to turn away, knowing she could not save it, and left with the others. Although the Jouberts did not follow the cub after that, it was assumed that it died. Although hard to watch, this type of situation happens in the wild all the time, and is part of nature, sad as it is.

The Jouberts discuss their policy of not intervening in the natural events the film, no matter how sad, when filming lions in an NPR interview. In part, they say:

Beverly Joubert: "That definitely would have been crossing a line for us. We made a policy years ago that we're out there to document. And that's what we do. We'll never intervene when it's a natural situation. So when it's nature playing out its game — without human interference — then we are completely hands-off and all we do is document, even though it's painful. But if we see a situation that is a man-made situation — for instance, an animal falling into a man-made waterhole or a snared animal or poachers shooting at animals — we do, we go straight in. We've had this happen before, when poachers have been shooting into elephants, and we're not even thinking about our own safety. We've driven straight toward them to confront them, and hopefully they will stop shooting."

You can read or listen to the entire interview at:

http://www.npr.org/2011/03/02/133999157/without-intervention-lions-heading-for-extinction

Posted by G10165 - Saturday, January 30th, 2016

Stop Making Excuses

You did not want to save the poor little cub or you would have done it, no matter what. You are Heartless people!!! all I can see is the mother Lions Broken heart and the baby crying to catch up to her. You make me and a lot of others sick to hear your lies. You just did not care!!!

Posted by G10258 - Thursday, August 11th, 2016

That baby cub deserved as much help as an infant baby!!!!!!

Anyone who thinks this cub should not have been helped is evil, and heartless. I am so damn sick of these people who swear they love animals saying they can't help!!!!! That is B.S. What about all the hurt and pain humans have caused animals? Millions of animals killed for money and it would be wrong to help a baby that you were filming. It isn't natural to follow and film them and profit from them though right? I am so sick and brokenhearted I wish I could show them what it feels like to be hurt and abandoned. DON'T watch anything these people are involved in. They are heartless scum!!!

Posted by G10188 - Friday, March 18th, 2016

To everyone who thinks the filmmakers were wrong.

They are right and nothing they wrote you back was wrong that is the life cycle in nature they all need to survive not just the lions and cubs because they are cute to you what about all the other animals that need to survive they live off each other this is the order of things and for people like you who act as if someone did something wrong because they did not get involved is ridiculous if you or anyone else feel like they can't handle this type of thing then stop watching nature because nature is cruel and hard sometimes and these are animals think about what humans do to each other and take a stand on that because were suppose to be the most intelligent mammals on earth but I can't tell especially when someone can't handle nature. We are more savage then the animals we watch and NO they should not intervene with nature other animals are also out there surviving and sad but true that was a meal to feed another animals offspring. I truly wish you people would use your common sense with all this, but then again I have come to realize that no everyone has common sense and its becoming fewer and fewer as the years go by. I am not calling anyone dumb or stupid we just need to think better than what we are doing that is why the world is lost in its own jungle right now we act more savage than any of the animals I watch. People don't stop donating to help animals just because you didn't like what nature does that is ignorant for that to be the reason you won't help animals because in all trueness that will be what it boils down to because I don't like what you didn't do I won't help the animals how does that sound if you don't like the filmmakers that is fine there are other organizations, but I would never say none of you animals will get my help because the filmmakers did not save a cub from nature not from man but from what acquires everyday, every minute in the wild. Did anyone say save the hyena I don't think so why because they aren't as cute to you come on people think nature is never nice on no level but it is what it is the circle of life they have to survive just as we do so stop right now killing cows, chickens and so on so that we can survive and eat. There is a reason that God made life like this the cycle must continue. So I truly suggest that if watching true real raw nature is to much for you then don't watch. I had to write to post on this because it is really disturbing that some of you can't see that this is nature or that you can't see the facts. We need to stay out of the way of nature all together were the reason they are almost extinct, but yet we still have no reason to stop the natural events that occur in nature regardless because I know some people say that since were the fault then we should step in no we shouldn't its their cycle of life so let them have it and worry more about the cycle of life with our own.

Posted by G9564 - Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

I don't see anything wrong for them not to intervene. This is part and parcel of nature. Like what one of the viewer say, we may feel sad for the lion, but this is how the nature works.

I was watching another lion's flim, on one hand, I was happy that the mother manage to hunt and kill the prey for it's weak and almost dying cub, but on the other hand, I feel bad for the prey.

Man should never intervene with nature and observe quietly.

Posted by G9570 - Thursday, November 21st, 2013

I was truly saddened by what happened to the baby cub, but it is nature and it happens all the time every day in the wild. There are no vets, medicine, or remedies that can help them that us humans use on "captive" animals. I am not offended by the film makers non participation to helping the cub because we should not be interferring with wild animals. The point of this film is to show us humans who have been taking up their land, poaching, hunting, and captivating them into circuses, sanctuarys, and zoos to let them be free in the wild and to respect them in their land as nature intended. Look up bear bile farms in china and tigers being starved to death in farms for their bones. Lets talk about that shall we, because those animals desperately need help.

Posted by G9683 - Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

for anyone who has love for animals it is impossible to think of leaving this baby the way this movie makers did, and put higher prio to following the lion. Of course it would die till tommorrow, it is absurd from their side to go searching it the other day, couldn't they do it when it was the right moment; Couldn't some member of the team stay with it, so that it didn't die alone, abandoned, sad and scared. It is clear for all that it did happens like this in nature, but I really cannot accept that people who think of themselfs of nature lovers will be so cruel. Whatever the movie makers say about their policy I cannot believe they simply followed the rules of their stupid policy and left it;

This baby could have been saved, maybe it would use those protesis with wheels in some zoo or something but since it had survived for a night this means that it had a chance to leave. There is something totally wrong to leave it because of some policy, I would prefer to loose my job, but I would have definetelly do something; Who says that this policy is right; For me it is totally wrong and this nat geo wild team showed the world

that they are everything else but animal-lovers. They should definitely change their stupid policy what's the difference is it man or not who caused the injury, there is a baby who needed help or at least a one shot how heartless those people should be just to leave it so scared I am sure that all of us would have preferred to not see what happened with the mother lion but to see those people try to do something about this little baby..............I really really really cannot accept it as right

Posted by jdbowen3 - Thursday, April 03rd, 2014

Those piece of shxt photographers. If I ever ran into the heartless bastxrds I would fuxk them up something serious. How could any animal lover do that? Do they not have pets? Did there dad fuxk them in ass when they were little? Well if it happens all the time why can't you save that one? If I was there I would have snagged him up immediately and he would still be alive today...crippled or un crippled. I can not explain how much this angers me, but I hope that lost their jobs or got eaten by a lion and are in hell now..where those sons of bitchs belong. I wish them nothing but the worse.

Posted by jdbowen3 - Friday, April 04th, 2014

Ever heard off freedom of speech assailed? Take me off your fucking discussions. Thanks

Posted by G9775 - Friday, April 18th, 2014

worst doc ever

Posted by G9812 - Monday, June 02nd, 2014

On a Facebook page dedicated to Ma di Tau, the producers explain their decision in detail and why they could not help the cub.

Posted by G9841 - Tuesday, July 08th, 2014

Just watched this documentary. My gosh...incredible. It was heartbreaking to watch the mother sit on the side of the water closing (appearing to mourn) her eyes knowing the cub was a loss. Heartbreaking. But the fire it ignited in her going after the bull with (what was made to appear anyway) her cubs blood on it was an absolutely earth shattering moment. The change in her was non mistakable and it appears all the lionesses realized it as well. Really incredible story.

Posted by G9842 - Tuesday, July 08th, 2014

""This baby could have been saved, maybe it would use those protesis with wheels in some zoo""

Really??? What kind of life would that have been for a lioness? Sure it would make us feel better to have a "happy ending" in our eyes but it would have just meant a prolonged lifetime of suffering for that cub. The only thing that would have meant a happy ending for that cub (not us) would have been to fully mend it to a point it could hunt and survive in the wild. I'm not a vet, but that appeared sadly impossible. It's hind legs were completely paralyzed.

Posted by G9907 - Thursday, October 16th, 2014

I think she got help

Posted by G9912 - Friday, October 24th, 2014

With each lions death in this documentary I cried heartbroken that they were left to suffer. My God do these people know no mercy? Why bring the plight of these beautiful animals to light then leave them to suffer an agonizing death? They seek monetary aid to help save these beautiful animals, yet what help was given to an injured defenseless cub? As sad as it was the mother had no choice in leaving her injured cub behind. But you film makers had a choice and you choose to not help that poor cub! What animal lover would do such a thing? you don't want to interfere with the nature of things but aren't you interfering by just your presence there? What we can do for the survival of these and all wild animals is STOP taking up their lands and STOP hunting them! It's that fricken easy let them LIVE without humans interferring. HUMANS are the problem! I don't know what laws if any are in place to secure the survival of these beautiful animals but I'm for some serious harsh punishment for those caught harming these animals. IM very upset and heartbroken over what I saw In The last Lions. Humans caused this and I'm ashamed to call myself human right now.

Posted by G9939 - Friday, November 07th, 2014

I just watched The Last Lions and like very many people was very upset by the vivid, complete film documenting of the heartbreaking scene of the cub with a broken back trying to keep up with her mother, crying for help and not to be left alone, it was terrible. The mother lion was given the animal instincts to do the only thing she could as hard as it was. But what about the filmmakers? I watched the "extras" that were provided with the film, HOPING to see the documentation of the cubs fate being resolved in a humane and responsibe way. NO. Anyone and everyone knows that films of this calibur are not made by two filmmakers out in the wilds alone. They have a whole entourage to assist and support their every need and want immediately. (one was shown in the "extras") They also have every means of instant communication and tracking available, should they be in danger or need help THEMSELVES. "Excuses" ("we had to follow the lioness") are just THAT: you excuse yourself from acting responsibly, and there IS NO EXCUSE. When ever you put yourelf, of your own free will in the position of "witness", you take on the responsibility to act in a responsible and humane way as far as what you see. Surely, there are Game Reserves or wild animal rescue agencies that would have stepped in to help those who should have acted right away. The filmmakers made a business decision. That they went back later is just a transparent excuse that does not excuse them. Ironiocally this act really wiped out a positive clear message from coming to the public. Everyone knows the cruelties of nature we as advanced "humans" are capable of trying at least to alieve them at more then one level.

Posted by G9955 - Sunday, November 23rd, 2014

Saddened by the outcome of the cub seems to me he was placed at the moment to receive help yet was neglected makes me sad to think that was the last moments the cub was alive captured on a documentary that will haunt me always yes filmmakers say they couldn't step in would have interfered with nature but in all reality we know exactly what should have been done mankind should have helped but was too negligence to realize you can observe the cub suffering but not observing the cub receiving the help he needed...

Posted by Guthix - Sunday, January 11th, 2015

Truly a touching scene, really makes you see your own problems in a whole new perspective. If there is one positive outcome of such emotion its to remind yourself to not neglect your friends and family and to truly appreciate what health and good fortune you have

I hope that in the future, the human race can co-exist peacefully with other people and animals alike and to all strive towards a global united consciousness so we can continue to research, understand and develop the future.

Posted by G10017 - Monday, May 04th, 2015

The excuse for the inhumane: "Beverly Joubert: "We'll never intervene when it's a natural situation. "

First of all, its not natural situations for documentary people to be there filming period so that overused outdated policy is hypocritical in the first place.

Shove a camera on the little cub, name it, show us the struggles, getting into its face and filming it crying, making us all attached.. inspiring hope when the other cubs tried to help..zooming into that precious little face to manipulate us , make us cry and be sick with worry so you can make money off of the poor crippled thing... Watch it starve while you guys sit in the jeep all comfy with your camera eating Cheetos..I wish a buffalo kicked each of you.. twice. and you were left in that desert --after we got some good close up footage of you guys crying and begging to get a ride to the hospital/water/food..

If someone is getting raped do you just whip out your cell phone to stand back and document that too? Sell it as a documentary? OH But Its not human so its okay to be inhumane? The cub had dreams emotions and a soul..unlike those of you "documenting". The cub put money in your bank accounts, fed you and your families- I bet your group didn't mind that part. Your line is drawn when it costs money to take him to a zoo or wildlife sanctuary; casually blame it on policy, you're all sick and heartless.. .

Human nature screams to us all to help the little cub. Out of a whole group of people not one single human had a brain/courage/heart/soul/common sense enough to stand up and make a difference. Don't try to over-complicate things saying how they kill buffalo, or be food for something else..or nature is cruel.. This has to do with THAT particular CUB going to a zoo or private institution instead of worm food. Worms aren't extinct. If you're that worried, throw the worm a steak. These beautiful cats are becoming EXTINCT.

Your team and policy are inhumane and hypocritical.No one would stand up and make the difference when opportunity not only knocked but was sitting smack dab in front of the camera crying for its life. In these situations it would not impact the environment more than your jeeps and equipment to have helped it and give it a chance to live.

Posted by G10045 - Wednesday, July 08th, 2015

I understand the Jouberts logic that they are only there to document and not to intervene 'in nature', however they miss the bigger picture that the fundamental reason they are there in the first place is because human intervention is harming these animals and as humans we are all part of nature.

This separation of humans from 'nature' is part of the catalyst causing these problems and unfortunately the Jouberts have reinforced this detachment perfectly with their steadfast ideals of 'not our position to intervene'. We all are creatures sharing this planet, humans refusal to admit they are already intervening is exacerbating this situation.

As humans, we have the gift of mercy. For a human to show mercy to a suffering creature is nature itself. This lion cub haunts me as it does the other commenters here, and we were only exposed to five minutes of the total timeframe involved. In my mind this must heavily weigh on the Jouberts as one of their bigger mistakes and regrets. If they don't feel this then that is the epitome of why these creatures are in so much danger.

Posted by G10070 - Sunday, August 16th, 2015

In the middle of watching the documentary and was so upset I had to google it. This is unbelievable.

This argument about intervention is illogical and lazy. There is good interference and bad interference. We intefere all the time -they were happy to interfere to film this cub's suffering for entertainment.

At least this would have been a good inteference - what ill effect could it possible have had? To end this poor cub's suffering at the very least would have taken nothing out of them.

There was another documentary I was watching where the filmaker had the good sense to "intefere" and dart a leopard mother and her cubs suffering from sarcoptic mange after watching another animal suffer the same and die a horrible death.

They just left it alone.

If they had been attacked while filming I wonder if they would just have let nature run it's course...

This shit is appalling.

They should have put on trigger warning on this documentary, it's actually traumatic.

Posted by G10071 - Sunday, August 16th, 2015

I CANN'T GET THE CUB WITH injured back cub. I DO NOT UNDERSTAND HOW THEY LEAVE A CRYING BABY IN NEED FOR HELP WITHOUT DOING ANYTHING TO HELP HER. I CANT BELEAVE THEY CARED ABOUT THE FILMING MORE THAN A CRYING SOUL.

Posted by G10072 - Sunday, August 16th, 2015

That was the saddest film i have seen ever. Will stay with me forever. I hoped that she was saved. Just hows human nature that no one stepped up to help. What difference would it have made if they had just helped that cub. Sad.

Posted by G10085 - Sunday, September 06th, 2015

I saw the movie about junior the lion cub but what people need to know is the cub back wad not broken, junior was paralyzed and besides his mother, he had an older brother who was a cub as well but much bigger took care of junior until he met his fate. Also, his brother and mother fed him, hug him a lot made sure he kept up with them and the whole entire pride. Junior had a very strong spirit and a spirit of determinenation of not to give up.

Posted by G10100 - Thursday, October 01st, 2015

go ahead , nicest part

dear VET ppl n all other ppl i wanna tell you all dt dont think 2 leave all dese kinda things 2 nature , no ; not at all .. its an old thinking n nw its d turn 2 make all d things ryt wich v can do .. so d JUNIOR must have taken 2 d treatment n plz plz plz plz make all d kid animals alive till der oldage time .. if wud b der i wud surely wait n catch d JUNIOR n have taken her 2 d treatment n den 2 ma house n den 2 her real house n family . v ppl shud stop thinkin 2 let it leave 2 d nature .. no .. be d nicest side of nature n help dem hwever . so go ahead n dont think anything else or as v all no dt thinkin more prevents many many things dt v can do n r simple .

Posted by G10136 - Thursday, December 17th, 2015

Why was the cub not saved by those filming. Buddhism is about respecting all living souls. How cruel to walk away.

Posted by G10141 - Monday, December 28th, 2015

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I am sending in this post several months late, as I only happened to see this bit of documentary footage yesterday.

It broke my heart to see the little lion cub with a broken back being left behind by her mother.

However, you have to understand that scenarios like this are being played out every day and night in the vast and ruthless world of nature.

There have been a few Wildlife photography scenes which have created an outpouring of emotion and concern.

One was the filming of a baby elephant that died of dehydration and starvation as it tried to keep up with its mother in a dried and parched land with no water or food. There was an international outcry demanding to know why the photographers could not have simply provided this baby elephant with a bit of water.

The other was the image of a seal, desperately trying to jump on to a boat with the photographers in it, as it was ruthlessly hunted by Orcas.

There are several other wildlife photography images that I can mention, but you might want to look at the images (where thankfully the photographers did not show the painful end) of a lioness who is seriously injured in an attempt to take on an animal that was more than a match for her, and when she realises how badly she has been injured, she leaves her pride, and waits for the hyenas who know that she is weak, to move in for the kill. I am guessing that the hyenas did not wait till she was dead.

Such is the brutal way of nature.

Let us as humans solve our own problems.

Watch the YouTube video of a poor little Rhino crying inconsolably by the carcass of its mother, killed just for her horn. Wake up to the fact that we as humans, kill animals indiscriminately for pleasure, depriving the innocent young of these species of a chance of survival.

What Wildlife photographers do is bring to your screens, the events that are being played out in Nature every day.

Let us at least correct our own cruelty before we punish the photographers who chose not to interfere with nature.

Arup

Posted by G10144 - Friday, January 01st, 2016

Here is the defense from film makers:

A few people have written to us regarding the lion cub with the broken back from our film ‘The Last Lions’, and expressed feelings of distress that we, as filmmakers, didn’t intervene. We understand these feelings and I want to take this opportunity to put that scene into context and explain why we chose to let nature run its course.

To better understand the situation you first need to know that we have spent some thirty years working with lions in the wild and we fully understand them, theirs lives, and their emotions. We have made it our life's mission to save this species. In fact, we established the Big Cats Initiative with the National Geographic Society specifically to raise money to donate to projects to save big cats. To date we have raised $5 million and all of that now finances 35 projects in 13 countries. Now much of that money is raised on the back of our films. ‘The Last Lions’, the film about the lioness who lost her cub, was one of these.

As filmmakers and producers of the film, ‘The Last Lions’, we convinced the National Geographic Society that if we elected to donate all our profits to conservation, that they should as well. They agreed! So ALL money from this scene you saw and from the film, went into saving big cats. It's the first time NGS has ever done this, so it's quite commendable.

The cub had a broken back. There is quite simply nothing to be done for an animal with a broken back sadly. We had two options: to watch and film nature (in its infinite wisdom) play out something that it has been doing, in the context of lions, for 3.5 million years quite successfully... or to step in and...what? Kill the cub. Yes, that was our only other option and I will explain why in a moment. We stopped carrying weapons in the bush in Africa twenty-five years ago because we do not believe in harming animals just to defend ourselves. I feel that usually, if you have a gun, you will find reasons to use it. We find we are more aware of our actions and better at avoidance, if we are not armed.

In this case, shooting the cub would have been an option, although even that would be problematic. Firstly we have developed a trust with this mother lion over seven years. Shooting her cub would have been emotionally destructive and we would have lost her trust. Killing the cub is considered highly illegal in Botswana, an offense that would put us in jail for poaching, and certainly would have made the government withdraw all of our future permits for research and filming, which would disallow us from doing any more films that could help save big cats in the future.

Also, in the absence of a rifle, we would have had to kill the cub by hand. As you can imagine approaching an injured lion cub with its mother nearby would not only be dangerous, but also extremely stressful for the cub. Ethically, I could not find myself adding a massive stress spike to the cub's last hours and feel it was right.

Our films talk about the purity of nature and that it has been pristine, and in many ways perfect, for billions of years. I believe that. If, in this cluttered, polluted, corrupted world, we cannot rely on the sanctity and purity of nature and all it's beauty, then there is little for us to hold on to. Of all the things we cannot judge or improve, it is nature.

However, if we do believe in its perfection, we must also accept some of its harshness. Not every lion cub born can survive, or we would have prides of enormous sizes. A pride of lions will have about eight females and each will have four cubs every two years for ten years. That would result in prides of over 100 lions, if we saved each one and it stayed with its family. The issue is that when we add hunting, poaching and trade on top of natural selection, we over-tax populations.

Even if our analysis on the day was wrong, and the cub could have survived with care, (I know it could not have) the nearest vet is 75 miles away and can only be flown in to our island. He would have had to apply to the government to get permission to dart and treat the cub, which as I suggested earlier, would not have been granted.

Even if it was granted, the cub had already been rejected by its mother and would have been committed to a zoo. This entire process would have taken a few days, which by the way, is more than the cub lasted. We don't have a zoo in Botswana and so we would have had to find a zoo in South Africa to accept the cub. I can almost guarantee not one zoo would do so, simply because a two-month old cub alone will not survive. Now I do not like or believe in zoos as holding pens for animals and see them as jails for orphans, so as we sat with the cub struggling on, Beverly close to tears, we weighed all this up carefully and decided with heavy hearts to take our lead from the wise mother of the cub. She understood that her cub was not going to live. We needed to understand that as well and we followed her away.

It has long been our policy not to interfere with nature. If for example, we come across a snared or gun shot animal, we will spare no expense to rectify what Man has inflicted. However, we believe what nature herself does can only be witnessed and understood and not interfered with. Books have been written on this and the ethics of wildlife filmmaking.

One last question remained and it was whether to share this heartbreaking scene with the world. We nearly did not. But we have always been honest with our audience and trust them with knowledge. Africa is not Disneyworld and people who want to understand life and enrich their world want to see a real version of what goes on. Truth sets us free of biases and misconceptions, and of course gives us a view of the world that is more fulfilling. Only once we are armed with a realistic view of that world can we be a part of finding solutions to the crisis I see we are in. With regards to wildlife and wild places, we believe our interest should be in saving the species in the wild, not trying to play God with Nature and injured cubs with no chance of survival.

Our film talks of the decline in lions from 450,000 to as few as 20,000 in our lifetime. That is what we need to focus on, because that represents more than a natural mortality where lions are attacked by buffalo. It represents a massive and systematic destruction of a species that Beverly and I are dedicating our lives, to stop.

The heart-felt emails we receive from people about these scenes indicate that there is a deep compassion for cats and anti-cruelty, which is commendable. I hope that my fuller explanation helps people channel these strong feelings into supporting causes that can be sweeping and effective. Frankly, we need more people like this who are willing to speak out and make sure that the deaths we witness are all natural ones, and not at the hands of hunters or poachers or for the trade in bones for ridiculous fads about their untrue medicinal uses, or in the case of spotted cats, to adorn people for beauty and fashion. We are on the abyss of catastrophic collapse of wild cat populations if we do nothing, or if we get distracted by the smaller picture of trying to save one lion at a time.

Caring with knowledge of how to be effective is the greatest weapon we have and we hope that ‘The Last Lions’ will continue to galvanize people to take action and help us. A world without lions will be a very sad one.

Kind regards

Dereck

Posted by G10172 - Friday, February 19th, 2016

Response to filmmaker

Thank you for taking the time to respond to the comments about the fate of the crippled cub. And I do understand your predicament when that happened and the issues with assisting. But as a viewer who loves animals and sees animals and humans as equal actually animals I feel are more connected to God and in my opinion more sacred that clip needed to come with a warning. If I see a baby cub the same way as a human baby watching that scene would be too much to bear. I know that is happening in the wild but I'm human and in our human experience that type of suffering of a baby is vary rarely witnessed. Yes it is natural but it doesn't mean we are equipped to deal with it since it is not "our" nature. Animals have a divine nature and a different perspective...they have much for faith and trust and would know how to move on but we are different! This was simply too much. I already love animals, I am already an activist, people like me do not need our hearts broken to open. I hope that makes sense. And to say Beverley was almost near tears, I was balling and I will everytime I think of it. It was too much for human nature of kind hearted people. Please keep doing what you are doing, I do see the dedication and love. But be sensitive to your audience who hasn't had 30 years of witnessing this cruelty of nature.

Posted by G10152 - Thursday, January 14th, 2016

Doesn't make sense that they claim that they didn't know where the lion went, watch the film and you can see the drag marks for hundreds of feet as it moved along...

Posted by G10161 - Thursday, January 21st, 2016

I think they should have had people stay with the lion to help her while the others go to film Mau di Tau.

Posted by G10167 - Friday, February 05th, 2016

Ok. When we watched this movie, our cat sat there and actually watched it with us---he was clearly interested that there were cats doing cat things. When the cub was injured and abandoned, my cat started frantically meowing and walking back and forth between us and the TV--he was telling us to do something to help the cub. He literally sat in front of the TV crying the rest of the day. If a house cat thinks it's messed up that no one helped that cub, what does that say about the people who rationalized to not help?

Posted by G10180 - Monday, March 07th, 2016

Meh, everyone here who hasn't a clue is moaning about the cub, but why deny another creature (Hyena, Vulture, Eagle) it's fair right to a tasty and nourishing meal?

Posted by G10191 - Wednesday, March 23rd, 2016

**MESSAGE FROM THE FILM MAKER**

A few people have written to us regarding the lion cub with the broken back from our film ‘The Last Lions’, and expressed feelings of distress that we, as filmmakers, didn’t intervene. We understand these feelings and I want to take this opportunity to put that scene into context and explain why we chose to let nature run its course.

To better understand the situation you first need to know that we have spent some thirty years working with lions in the wild and we fully understand them, theirs lives, and their emotions. We have made it our life's mission to save this species. In fact, we established the Big Cats Initiative with the National Geographic Society specifically to raise money to donate to projects to save big cats. To date we have raised $5 million and all of that now finances 35 projects in 13 countries. Now much of that money is raised on the back of our films. ‘The Last Lions’, the film about the lioness who lost her cub, was one of these.

As filmmakers and producers of the film, ‘The Last Lions’, we convinced the National Geographic Society that if we elected to donate all our profits to conservation, that they should as well. They agreed! So ALL money from this scene you saw and from the film, went into saving big cats. It's the first time NGS has ever done this, so it's quite commendable.

The cub had a broken back. There is quite simply nothing to be done for an animal with a broken back sadly. We had two options: to watch and film nature (in its infinite wisdom) play out something that it has been doing, in the context of lions, for 3.5 million years quite successfully... or to step in and...what? Kill the cub. Yes, that was our only other option and I will explain why in a moment. We stopped carrying weapons in the bush in Africa twenty-five years ago because we do not believe in harming animals just to defend ourselves. I feel that usually, if you have a gun, you will find reasons to use it. We find we are more aware of our actions and better at avoidance, if we are not armed.

In this case, shooting the cub would have been an option, although even that would be problematic. Firstly we have developed a trust with this mother lion over seven years. Shooting her cub would have been emotionally destructive and we would have lost her trust. Killing the cub is considered highly illegal in Botswana, an offense that would put us in jail for poaching, and certainly would have made the government withdraw all of our future permits for research and filming, which would disallow us from doing any more films that could help save big cats in the future.

Also, in the absence of a rifle, we would have had to kill the cub by hand. As you can imagine approaching an injured lion cub with its mother nearby would not only be dangerous, but also extremely stressful for the cub. Ethically, I could not find myself adding a massive stress spike to the cub's last hours and feel it was right.

Our films talk about the purity of nature and that it has been pristine, and in many ways perfect, for billions of years. I believe that. If, in this cluttered, polluted, corrupted world, we cannot rely on the sanctity and purity of nature and all it's beauty, then there is little for us to hold on to. Of all the things we cannot judge or improve, it is nature.

However, if we do believe in its perfection, we must also accept some of its harshness. Not every lion cub born can survive, or we would have prides of enormous sizes. A pride of lions will have about eight females and each will have four cubs every two years for ten years. That would result in prides of over 100 lions, if we saved each one and it stayed with its family. The issue is that when we add hunting, poaching and trade on top of natural selection, we over-tax populations.

Even if our analysis on the day was wrong, and the cub could have survived with care, (I know it could not have) the nearest vet is 75 miles away and can only be flown in to our island. He would have had to apply to the government to get permission to dart and treat the cub, which as I suggested earlier, would not have been granted.

Even if it was granted, the cub had already been rejected by its mother and would have been committed to a zoo. This entire process would have taken a few days, which by the way, is more than the cub lasted. We don't have a zoo in Botswana and so we would have had to find a zoo in South Africa to accept the cub. I can almost guarantee not one zoo would do so, simply because a two-month old cub alone will not survive. Now I do not like or believe in zoos as holding pens for animals and see them as jails for orphans, so as we sat with the cub struggling on, Beverly close to tears, we weighed all this up carefully and decided with heavy hearts to take our lead from the wise mother of the cub. She understood that her cub was not going to live. We needed to understand that as well and we followed her away.

It has long been our policy not to interfere with nature. If for example, we come across a snared or gun shot animal, we will spare no expense to rectify what Man has inflicted. However, we believe what nature herself does can only be witnessed and understood and not interfered with. Books have been written on this and the ethics of wildlife filmmaking.

One last question remained and it was whether to share this heartbreaking scene with the world. We nearly did not. But we have always been honest with our audience and trust them with knowledge. Africa is not Disneyworld and people who want to understand life and enrich their world want to see a real version of what goes on. Truth sets us free of biases and misconceptions, and of course gives us a view of the world that is more fulfilling. Only once we are armed with a realistic view of that world can we be a part of finding solutions to the crisis I see we are in. With regards to wildlife and wild places, we believe our interest should be in saving the species in the wild, not trying to play God with Nature and injured cubs with no chance of survival.

Our film talks of the decline in lions from 450,000 to as few as 20,000 in our lifetime. That is what we need to focus on, because that represents more than a natural mortality where lions are attacked by buffalo. It represents a massive and systematic destruction of a species that Beverly and I are dedicating our lives, to stop.

The heart-felt emails we receive from people about these scenes indicate that there is a deep compassion for cats and anti-cruelty, which is commendable. I hope that my fuller explanation helps people channel these strong feelings into supporting causes that can be sweeping and effective. Frankly, we need more people like this who are willing to speak out and make sure that the deaths we witness are all natural ones, and not at the hands of hunters or poachers or for the trade in bones for ridiculous fads about their untrue medicinal uses, or in the case of spotted cats, to adorn people for beauty and fashion. We are on the abyss of catastrophic collapse of wild cat populations if we do nothing, or if we get distracted by the smaller picture of trying to save one lion at a time.

Caring with knowledge of how to be effective is the greatest weapon we have and we hope that ‘The Last Lions’ will continue to galvanize people to take action and help us. A world without lions will be a very sad one.

Kind regards

Dereck

Posted by G10255 - Tuesday, August 09th, 2016

People are always trying to tame ALLAL's world.

I am confused by all the criticism that iis being poor out from the comments on this blog. I too was moved to tears by the little lion cub, but I at least understood why the crew could not intervene iin this natural act of selection. If ALLAH chose to allow this poor creature to parish, who are we to interfere? It the action of man's taking of their habitat that has to be checked not the actions of nature. Do we help the buffalo that iis being attacked by a pride of lions? No. Same principal applies here. Nature makes no mistakes, people do.

Posted by G10251 - Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

I see so many comments from American audience complaining about the actions of the filmakers...

I never like to be demeaning but darn, people... You speak of something you do not understand!!!

Nature is nature, Survival of the fittest... Despite the rightful and clear explanation from Dereck, Berverly and National Geographic, you still refuse to open your eyes...

1. The cub would not survive, broken back cannot be healed.

2. Even if a zoo will take her in, she will have no quality of life. She cannot be a real lion and will be rejected from reserves and zoos.

3. Funding that would have been used for the logistics, medical care and daily life for caring of this lion with a broken back will be wasted. These funds could be used on other animals that have been harmed by humans or acutally have a chance at survival. Don't think you have so much money to fund this injured lion.

4. Stop saying that the filmakers are heartless and stop calling them bastards! Without their hard work we would not have this knowledge. All who have seen this documentary must have been touched and gained knowledge of our beautiful world and this is something priceless.

The filmakers made a decision to let nature run its course which I completely agree with. Nature can be cruel but it is nature, some must die in order for others to live. Humans are cruel consciously and in many of these comments without common sense.

5. No the filmakers cannot stay with the cub, it is not a pet. Changing its mindset is not wise - we can see animals understand and have emotions although primal. Giving it hope is even more cruel than letting nature take its course.

I am heartbroken for both cubs who died. But what happened is natural in the wild.

I want to thank the filmakers for making the movie, the whole crew! It was an amazing movie. I grew up in Southern Africa and I love learning about the wild. Those buffalos are tough! I wish there was a number 2 to see the male cub grow and the new pride dominate!

Posted by G10302 - Tuesday, December 06th, 2016

I just saw this film with my son and we were both moved to tears. The decision for the mother to leave her baby behind was, obviously painful for her. You can see the moment she stops to process what she has to do completely breaks her spirit. It was the picture of absolute hopelessness. My heart broke for this poor cub and her mom's decision to walk away. I believe she chose not to turn back, not bc she didn't love her cub, but because she knew she couldn't. It would have been too hard. This movie changed me forever.

Discussions

The last lions
no reply yet - What type of man can see a creature in need and do nothing. Thats what sets us apart as men. It is supposed to set us apart. U can not rationalize...
The last lions
no reply yet - I love animals more than anything in this world. I so much would love to go to Africa to volenteer my help, but I don't know what organization to get...

Start a Topic

Explore more

The Last of the Secret Agents?( 1966 )The Last of the Secret Agents?
Directed by: N. Abbott, starring M. Allen, S. Rossi, J. Williams, N. Sinatra...

The Last of the Cowboys( 1977 )The Last of the Cowboys
Directed by: J. Leone, starring H. Fonda, E. Brennan, A. Pendleton, R. Englund...

The Last of the Mohicans( 1992 )The Last of the Mohicans
Directed by: M. Mann, starring D. Day-Lewis, M. Stowe, R. Means, E. Schweig...

Disclaimer:
  • Due to health issues, this site has been maintained on and off during the last few years. Some information is outdated, and I am trying to fix things progressively. I am developing this site alone as a hobby and in case anyone could enjoy it; profits from ads, if any, are used to try to help improve the life of my best friend, who is disabled, and to support a charity which rescues cats. Thank you in advance for your indulgence -The Webmaster-
  • Messages posted at this site are the sole opinion and responsibility of the poster. In no way will Theiapolis.com be liable or responsible for their content. If you believe something is inappropriate please do not hesitate to report it.
  • Information available at this site are based on the contributions submitted movie fans (visitors, registered members). I cannot guarantee the validity, accuracy or reliability of the information found here. If there are mistakes, or outdated information, I truly apologize. You can use the contact form to submit additionnal information. Thank you!
054221076068|usa|20171217|if|0.111|0.112|0.112|3.2|ca7
Picture "The Sleeping Beauty"Picture "The Debt"Photo features Jeff Bridges (Marshal Reuben J. Cogburn) from "True Grit"Photo includes Samuel L. Jackson (Valentine) in "Kingsman: The Secret Service"Photo "Holy Rollers"Picture "The Day After Tomorrow"Picture "Gake no ue no Ponyo"Photo shows Johnny Depp (Willy Wonka) in "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory"Picture "The Ghosts of Girlfriends Past"Picture "Star Trek Into Darkness"Picture "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo"Picture "New York, I Love You"Picture "Blood Done Sign My Name"Photo featuring Noah Ringer (Aang) issued from "The Last Airbender"Picture "The Losers"Photo with Sarah Polley (Elsa) in "Splice"Photo shows Dina Meyer (Dizzy Flores) in "Starship Troopers"Photo featuring Samuel L. Jackson (Sgt. Wes Luger) issued from "Loaded Weapon 1"Picture "One Good Man"Picture "Kidnapped"Picture "Saint Seiya: Legend of Sanctuary"Picture "The Fighter"Picture "Armored"Photo "Machete"Picture "Vincere"Picture "The Stepfather"